loader
 
As Tanzania celebrates 60 years of independence ‘late’ next month, school drop  outs due to pregnancy to ‘reseat’ exams

As Tanzania celebrates 60 years of independence ‘late’ next month, school drop outs due to pregnancy to ‘reseat’ exams

Besides football, a major topic of discussion among Tanzanians recently, has been the decision by the government to let school girls who are forced to drop out of school due to pregnancy, join mainstream education again.

Some commend the government for that decision; others smell arm-twisting by organisations such as the World Bank; yet others fear that the move will encourage other girls to get pregnant without fear. But the government is firm on its decision as is reported on the front-page of the Daily Blog of 25 November, in a news item titled: “60th Independence Anniversary: education for all remains big agenda”.

In the opening paragraph, the writer had this to say: “As Tanzania prepares to celebrate 60 years of independence ‘late next month’, the Ministry of Education says the government is fully committed to removing barriers in the education sector, including allowing pregnant girls in both primary and secondary schools to continue with formal studies after delivering”.

The news item was written in November, so, by “next month”, the writer had the current month of December in mind. But, do we celebrate Independence “late December?” Certainly not. Independence Day is 9 December, and this is, in no way, late in the month.

Clearly, the writer had “early December” in mind, much as the writing was done, “late November”. The Minister for Education is quoted as saying that: “in efforts to ensure that all Tanzanians get the required basic education, pupils whose examination results are annulled because of cheating, and those who do not make it to the ‘rate pass’ will be given ‘the’ second chance to ‘re-seat’ for the national examination”.

There are many cases, where students who do their examination again, are purported to be “reseating” the exams, and are therefore referred to as “reseaters”. Indeed in another part of this article, the idea of ‘reseating’ is emphasized.

The Minister, for example, told the press that: “The National Examination Council of Tanzania (NECTA) will soon provide the modalities on how pupils in these groups can ‘reseat’ for their exams, and those who will ‘reseat’ and pass will be allowed to continue with their studies in public schools”. “Reseat” is coming from “seat”, which, as a verb, means arrange for someone to sit somewhere. You can seat guests, for example.

“To sit”, has many meanings, including (in British English), “to take an examination”. If you take an examination for a second time you resit it. Therefore, forget about ‘reseating for’ the examination. We are emboldened to replace “reseat” with “resit”, wherever the former is to be found in the sentences above, as in the paragraph below: “The National Examination Council of Tanzania (NECTA) will soon provide modalities on how pupils in these groups can ‘resit’ their exams.

Those who will ‘resit’ and pass will be allowed to continue with their studies in public schools”. Education occupied primary space in the Daily Blog of November 25, as this bold front page headline implies: “Classroom construction pays off”.

Writing from Dodoma, a reporter tells us the following: “Government’s efforts to construct new classrooms ‘has’ finally paid off as all pupils who have passed 2021 ‘Primary Leaving Examinations’ will next year join secondary schools” The writer is referencing Government’s efforts (plural).

Why then consequently gravitate to the singular, when it comes to the verb? “Efforts ‘has’ paid off? No! I would say: “Government efforts have (not, ‘has’) paid off”.

How about “Primary Leaving Examinations?” The writer was surely thinking in Swahili, where “Praimari” implies a school in the early stages. Writing in this other language, we cannot take it for granted that “Primary” necessarily refers to a level of education.

It is best if we were specific: “Primary School Leaving Examination”. Yes: “Government efforts to construct new classrooms have finally paid off as all pupils who have passed ‘the’ 2021 ‘Primary School Leaving Examinations’ will next year join secondary schools” All the best with your education young Tanzanians!

lusuggakironde@gmail. com

foto
Author: LUSUGA KIRONDE

Post your comments

Advertisement

CRDB

Recent Posts

Categories

more headlines in our related posts

latest # news