loader
Picha

STUDY: Childhood obesity linked to later bedtimes

A new study has revealed the relationship between a later bed-time with an increased risk of obesity for children under the age of 6, CNN has reported.

Scientists have found that children who habitually went to sleep late had a wider waist and higher body mass index (BMI).

The researchers however said parents shouldn’t start putting their child to sleep earlier rather focus on maintaining a regular routine when it comes to scheduling meal and bed times.

Dr. Claude Marcus, a professor of pediatrics at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden and an author of the study, which was published on Tuesday in the journal Pediatrics, said the research, which was part of a wider study on obesity, focused on 107 children in Sweden, with 64 of the children having a parent who classified as overweight or obese.

The researchers monitored each child’s weight, height and waist circumference from ages one to six; all of the children had similar measurements when the study started.

They found that children who habitually went to sleep late defined by the researchers as past 9 p.m. had a wider waist and higher BMI (body mass index) by the end of the study.

“This late bedtime was one factor that really stood out. It was associated with increased weight,” Marcus was quoted.

However, he added that it was possible there could be a physical link simply because some of the brain regions involved in regulating sleep and wake cycles also manage eating and fasting behavior.

STUDY: Childhood obesity linked to later bedtimes

CNN

A new study has revealed the relationship between a later bed-time with an increased risk of obesity for children under the age of 6, CNN has reported.

Scientists have found that children who habitually went to sleep late had a wider waist and higher body mass index (BMI).

The researchers however said parents shouldn’t start putting their child to sleep earlier rather focus on maintaining a regular routine when it comes to scheduling meal and bed times.

Dr. Claude Marcus, a professor of pediatrics at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden and an author of the study, which was published on Tuesday in the journal Pediatrics, said the research, which was part of a wider study on obesity, focused on 107 children in Sweden, with 64 of the children having a parent who classified as overweight or obese.

The researchers monitored each child’s weight, height and waist circumference from ages one to six; all of the children had similar measurements when the study started.

They found that children who habitually went to sleep late defined by the researchers as past 9 p.m. had a wider waist and higher BMI (body mass index) by the end of the study.

“This late bedtime was one factor that really stood out. It was associated with increased weight,” Marcus was quoted.

However, he added that it was possible there could be a physical link simply because some of the brain regions involved in regulating sleep and wake cycles also manage eating and fasting behavior.

 

The number of coronavirus cases in Kenya increased ...

foto
Author: CNN

Post your comments

Recent Posts

Categories

more headlines in our related posts

latest # news